VSED (Voluntarily Stopping Eating & Drinking

There is now a concerted effort being made by doctor-prescribed suicide advocates to gain acceptance for what is called voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED).  Residents of assisted living facilities and others who are considered frail or disabled are being urged to consider this “option.” 

You might wonder what this has to do with euthanasia by lethal injection and doctor-prescribed suicide.

The answer was given by a speaker at an international euthanasia conference some years ago.  During her presentation, she promoted death by the removal of food and fluids.  She went on to explain that once people see how painful death by starvation and dehydration is, then, “in the patient’s best interest,” they will accept the lethal injection.
(Source: Deadly Compassion, William Morrow and Company, pp. 94 and 267)

Important Questions & Answers about VSED

Articles

“The Ethics of Food and Drink: Starvation is not mercy”
(Weekly Standard — July 28, 2014)
Should the law compel nursing homes to starve certain Alzheimer’s patients to death?  This is not an alarmist fantasy, but a real question, soon to be forced by advocates of ever-wider application or assisted euthanasia. The intellectual groundwork is already being laid for legislation or court orders requiring nursing homes, hospitals, and other facilities to withhold spoon feeding from dementia patients who, though they take food and drink willingly , once requested the withholding of life-prolonging measures in an advance medical directive.

“Advance Directives, Dementia, and Withholding Food and Water by Mouth”
(Hastings Center Report 44, no. 3 (2014): 23 37)
The authors argue, “If incompetent people do not lose their rights to refuse life-saving treatment, and if people when competent have just as strong a right to VSED as they do to refuse life-saving treatment, then people do not lose their right to voluntarily stopping eating and drinking when incompetent either.  They only have to exercise it by advance directives.”

“A Traveler’s Final Story”
(Herald Tribune — March 23, 2014)
Sixteen days without a morsel of food. Sixteen days without a gulp of water….”[I]f someone asked me do do this again, I’d tell them I want no part of it,” says Helen. “I’d strongly suggest they look into all the reasons they want to leave — and then that they get some goddamn pills.”….”I don’t think Dorothy ever considered the burden you are putting on people by asking them to help.”….

“Old or Sick People Starve Yourselves!”
(National Review — July 24, 2013)
In the Journal of Medical Ethics, Julian Savulescu argues that doctors should help suicidal patients starve themselves to death.  He means voluntary self starvation — also pushed in the euthanasia movement as VSED (voluntarily stopping eating and drinking).

“Guest Column: Ensuring death with dignity”
(Rock River Times — February 2, 2012)
Done right, VSED can bring a safe and peaceful end; however, the process is relatively lengthy, between one and two weeks, on average. To manage any pain, patients require sustained palliative care, which is often difficult and expensive to arrange. Twenty five percent of individuals who choose this route have difficult and painful deaths. It is often devastating for their loved ones to watch individuals deny themselves food and drink for two weeks, even when those individuals have made a conscious choice to do so.